Mercer County ATV resort grows to meet the needs of riders

images1BILL ARCHER
Bluefield Daily Telegraph

BLUEWELL — Visitors roll into southern West Virginia and southwestern Virginia for year-round four-wheeler traffic, and Buffalo Trail Cabins, Cottages and Campgrounds is getting ready for a summer of fun as the facility grows to meet a growing demand.

“Our tree houses are new this year,” Seth Peters said. “We have six finished and four more almost finished. We’re booked through the summer and we anticipate filling up the new cabins as soon as they are finished.”

Each cabin and cottage has a clever name — some based on the local area and others named for some of the real-life individuals and places associated with the Hatfield-McCoy Feud.

“We get most of our guests from the Hatfield-McCoy Trails web site,” Peters said. “They really do a good job.” He said that Buffalo Trail connects to the Hatfield-McCoy Trail in Montcalm, but added that the trail system is working on a connection to the resort. He is constantly working to create unique attractions at the resort. Peters got some metal from a friend who was tearing down an old tobacco barn in North Carolina to use as siding for one of the tree houses — the one he calls “Tree Shack.”

Each tree house is unique with an enclosed area with bunk beds as well as a private outdoor deck connected to each tree house with seating and space enough to accommodate the number of persons at each cabin.
In addition to the tree houses, Peters and his staff have been maintaining the guest cottages in readiness for the busy summer.

Guests will also be able to enjoy a new feature this year, a micro-brewery complete with an open-seating dining room that will seat 85 people.

“We can seat 300 in the resort for a wedding,” Peters said. “We had 268 in here for dinner last Sunday.”

Buffalo Trail opened in March 2014 and is situated on a 75-acre tract next to the family farm that Peters grew up on. Peters graduated from Bluefield High School in 1990, Concord University in 1994 and worked outside of the area before returning home to open Buffalo Trail.